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Posted on : Sep 26, 2016 [0] comments Label:

Draft - KPI for Public Sector

by : Omarali Matjais
Efficiency and Effectiveness
Aligning and optimising resources

Transformational Government Strategy has increased the pressure on public sector organisations to become more citizen-centred, results-oriented and collaborative. The need for informed decision-making to focus, prioritise, align and optimise limited resources has never been greater. Key performance indicators, programme effectiveness, financial accountability, costs, capital planning, performance-based contracts, HR workforce planning, e-procurement and outsourcing, sustainability all need to be tracked and monitored. The data is there, but not always the insight.



Safety and Security
Predicting and preventing threats

A critical issue for government, particularly when resources are stretched, is to protect people, property, money and now data from growing and evolving threats. In areas such as defence, justice, crime, health and transport safety the requirement for accurate information that provides insight into the existing situation and helps predict and prevent future threats continues to grow.

Compliance and Reporting
Meeting external requirements and driving internal benefits

Public sector bodies are experiencing an explosion in the volume of data they produce. At the same time, the requirement to comply with external regulations and reporting, particularly in areas such as data protection and security, has never been higher. Improving data accuracy and reducing the time and cost of reporting are now basic requirements. However, instead of viewing regulation and reporting as a burden and a cost to be managed, the information produced should be used to provide the additional insight and understanding that can transform the management of risk as well as the overall performance of the organisation.

Fraud and Risk
Detecting and preventing the loss of vital resources

Public sector bodies are experiencing an explosion in the volume of data they produce. At the same time, the requirement to comply with external regulations and reporting, particularly in areas such as data protection and security, has never been higher. Improving data accuracy and reducing the time and cost of reporting are now basic requirements. However, instead of viewing regulation and reporting as a burden and a cost to be managed, the information produced should be used to provide the additional insight and understanding that can transform the management of risk as well as the overall performance of the organisation.
Posted on : Feb 18, 2016 [0] comments Label:

Update Your Home

by : Omarali Matjais



Source: Click Here
Posted on : Jan 19, 2015 [0] comments Label:

Nine money optimisation guidelines

by : Omarali Matjais
Nine money optimisation guidelines

1. Start saving effectively. There are two methods of saving. One is where you spend off your monthly expenses and save what is remaining. As you may have guessed, this is an ineffective way to save.

More so, with the implementation of GST and the ensuing higher inflation rate expected in 2015, monthly household and personal expenses are bound to increase substantially – possibly leaving little to no savings.

A more effective approach is to save first and then spend the balance. Set a goal and force yourself to put aside a portion of your income to reach that goal before using the remainder for your expenses.

2. Actively look for suitable investment opportunities. The best return on investment (ROI) is one that beats the inflation rate. However, as long as you put your money into something that is performing better than the current rate, you are already optimising your money.

Set a bar for your ROI. For example, if you are looking to invest money from a fixed deposit, logically, your goal should be to look for something at least with higher returns than the fixed deposit.

On a more cautionary note, the investment environment for 2015 is expected to continue being volatile and unpredictable. Therefore, avoid high-risk investment deals such as small-cap shares, speculative properties and high risk unit trust funds. Look for opportunities that have a medium to low risk factor to avoid serious losses to your capital.

3. Compare and analyse investment options. Make apple-to-apple comparisons with other similar investment funds. If another fund is doing better than your current one, don’t hesitate to jump ship. Optimising your money is about tapping into the best returns possible (while minimising your risks).

4. Cut your losses and move on. Unless you are very lucky with your decisions, you are bound to come across an investment that may lose money. When this happens, it is essential to cut your losses and move on to something that is better performing.

Many tend to wait it out, hoping that the market will rebound, only to end up suffering from bigger losses, and losing out on the opportunity to optimise their money further.

5. Keep a cash reserve of at least six months of your expenses and monthly commitments. For retirees, put aside a cash reserve of at least three years. Cash reserves are important to grant you a holding power over your investments. Say, for example, you happen to buy into a solid investment at the wrong time, just before it takes a steep plunge. Without a cash reserve, you would have no choice but to sell out at a big loss should you be in dire need of money. But if you have holding power, you would be able to hold your investment and sell it off at a high profit – at best – or at a smaller loss – at worst.

6. Diversify your investments. Don’t put all your eggs into one basket. This may sound like a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised. It is almost human nature to put all your trust and money into one proven market. However, doing so opens you up to a big risk. What happens if that one market takes a sudden hit? All your work of optimising your money thus far would go down the drain.

Diversify your money and risk factors across other investments such as bonds, stocks, real estate, cash and commodities. That way, if one risk factor translates to reality, not all your investments would suffer the blow.

This strategy is especially important when the investment environment is highly volatile and unpredictable. Six months ago, no one would have predicted that crude oil prices could drop below US$50 and cause chaos to the financial world.

7. Always invest prudently and calculate your risks. Does your investment guarantee the return of your capital? Does the government regulate it? If it is a foreign government, is it stable? Is there a trustee in place to hold your investment? Do you know what percentage of your investment the trustee holds? All these are matters you should investigate and probe into before entrusting your money into an investment.

8. Minimise your insurance premiums. With the numerous insurance plans and even more convincing agents out there, we could very well be putting more cash than we should into insurance. As a rule of thumb, the total insurance premiums you pay in a year should not exceed 15% of your gross annual income.

9. Contain your mortgage interest cost. Mortgage interest rates are hard to predict, and could affect your finances drastically if left unnoticed. Housing loan interest rates are expected to increase in 2015. You can counter the impact by opting for a fixed interest rate loan. While the interest rate would be slightly higher, it will remain secure throughout your repayment, which will be beneficial toward your long-term financial planning.

When interest rates do rise, you can choose to pay a higher monthly instalment to ensure that your loan can be paid off within the original period. This, however, should be a carefully-considered decision as it could affect your cash flow and your money optimisation. Alternatively, consider using your liquid investments that are earning lower investment returns than the prevailing interest rate to pay off your mortgage.

To conclude, I would like to reiterate that the above pointers act as a general guideline for the upcoming year. While it is advisable to follow the financial recommendations mentioned here, everyone has different lifestyles and financial goals that they want to achieve.

No cost is too small to overlook. A small mistake now could affect your finances significantly during your retirement years.

To ensure you reach your financial goals smoothly, it is advisable to develop a tailor-made and holistic financial plan to help you optimise your money and meet your financial goals.


Source: Yap Ming Hui (yap@yapminghui.com)  He heads Whitman Independent Advisors, a licensed independent financial advisory firm.
by : Omarali Matjais
An Australian nurse is suing AirAsia over an incident last year in which a stewardess fell on her when the plane hit turbulence during a flight to Thailand.

Australian daily Herald Sun reported that the fall caused 36-year-old Erin Crocker multiple joint franctures and a torn ligament which required major surgery.

It said Crocker had rejected a settlement offer from AirAsia, which her lawyer Nancy Yonan described as "only a minute fraction of the claim’s true value".

AirAsia, which recently suffered its first air disaster after flight QZ8501 from Surabaya to Singapore crashed into the Java Sea killing all 162 on board, had also wanted her to agree not to make any further claims, the report added.

Yonan said Crocker initially did not want to take "money away from those victims" by pursuing her legal action, but eventually decided to "fight for her rights".

AirAsia has had trouble in the past with Australian authorities.

In 2012, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), a consumer watchdog, took legal action against the airline for allegedly failing to disclose the full price of fares for flights from Australia.

The Federal Court in Melbourne later imposed a penalty of A$200,000 against the budget airline for contravening the single pricing provision of the Australian Consumer Law.

“Unless the full price is prominently displayed the consumer may well be attracted to a transaction which he or she would not otherwise have found to be appealing and grudgingly pay the additional imposts rather than go to the trouble of withdrawing from the transaction and looking elsewhere,” said judge Richard Tracey in his judgement. – January 18, 2015.
Source: MSN
Posted on : Dec 5, 2014 [0] comments Label:

12 Myths about Sex

by : Omarali Matjais
Sourc: Babamail These myths not only mislead but may actually cause frustration among many couples, who strive to obey and accomplish these myths without realizing that's all they are. So here are 12 myths about sex that you should know the truth about...

Posted on : Nov 28, 2014 [0] comments Label:

Penamaan semula Jalan di Wilayah Persekutuan

by : Omarali Matjais
8 buah jalan diberi nama semulamengenangkan jasa pemimpin-pemimpin kita

Posted on : [0] comments Label:

Keputusan UPSR 2014

by : Omarali Matjais
Keputusan yang sentimental bagi kebanyakkan orang kerana kes kebocoran soalan. Beberapa kertas yang perlu diduduki semula

Posted on : Nov 26, 2014 [0] comments Label:

Burnt-out young lady of mine

by : Omarali Matjais
A week ago my daughter talked to me about her working environment in her workplace. She was employed by an American company in Subang Jaya. and positioned as supply chain officer taking care of importers from Singapore. Only those who possesed good command of English are qualified to be here. At the age of 22, I consider her as young professional.

Her firm has a "work till night" culture and everyone were putting in long hours. It looks bad if you leave early from office.  From my gathering, she was stressfully staying in office between 10 to 12 hours a day  against the normal 8-hour for normal institutions.
he struggled with the decision to quit his job for a year and is now thinking of working as a property agent or teacher. - See more at: http://www.straitstimes.com/news/singapore/health/story/more-young-professionals-suffering-burn-out-20140414#sthash.k5LZMoqA.dpuf
he struggled with the decision to quit his job for a year and is now thinking of working as a property agent or teacher. - See more at: http://www.straitstimes.com/news/singapore/health/story/more-young-professionals-suffering-burn-out-20140414#sthash.k5LZMoqA.dpuf

Her case was not uncommon. When I was in the banks my boss wanted me to work 24/7 to achieve the given target. True enough, you like it or not, almost every minutes you are thinking about selling and targets.

I told her the targets was not at all the main issue but her immediate boss must be someone who could manage and balance this burn-out situation.  Her boss can help their employees work smarter with better delegation of tasks, clearer instructions and by focusing on results instead of "face time". If your bosses are the 'I want this and that' type without 'balancing' the office atmosphere against work demand - that is where many young professionals were ending up with medical problems, including insomnia, depression and hypertension.

Such burn-out should not be taken lightly. It can deteriorate to full-blown depressive or anxiety disorders, with severe symptoms such as feelings of hopelessness and suicidal thoughts.

Staying stressful hours in office comes from the strong desire of young professionals to prove themselves. But the problem has been exacerbated in recent years because of the manpower crunch in many industries. But that does not mean they are more productive.

In her case, she took longer time to finish her task because of poor planning and lack of clear instructions by supervisor. She was already thinking of quiting the job to continue her master degree.

Note: Stay strong Nadia and take it as a lerning process.